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Who doesn’t love cookies?  

Cookies have descended from the earliest food cooked by man: a grain/water paste baked on hot stones by Neolithic farmers 10,000 years ago. The development of cookies came from biscuits (Old French Biscoit: meaning twice cooked). It was a way to create a food that was practical and convenient to carry around without spoiling, especially for travelers. As time went on, ancient civilizations in the Middle East started to explore adding various ingredients to the basic grain/water paste.  Eggs, butter, cream and sweeteners like honey or dried fruit were added which converted the simple biscuit to a delicious cake-cookie. In the middle ages, refined sugar became available and the official cookie (meaning small cake) was born.

Today, commercial cookies have been highly processed and instead of your standard, butter, sugar and flour ingredients you have refined flours, bleached flours, GMO flours, edible oil varieties (palm oil, vegetable oil (what does this mean?), soy bean oil, corn oil), and refined sugars (corn syrup, fructose, dextrose). This processing creates “foods” that are inflammatory foods which can aggravate or create health problems if consumed frequently. Of course baked goods and cookies have gained a bad reputation!

Here, you will find some of my favourite easy simple cookie recipes that taste great and are healthier then your standard dessert. But remember, a cookie is still a cookie. Enjoy!

Tahini Cookie

Almond-Sesame Cookie

Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookie

Triple Ginger Cookie

Chocolate Chip Cookie

Almond Oatmeal Cookies

Chocolate Chip Mint Cookie

Fibre Rich Breakfast Cookie

Oatmeal Coconut Raisin Cookie

Almond Cookie

 

References

  • The book of Cookies and Crackers, 1982 (page 5)
  • The Oxford Companion to Food, Alan Davidson [Oxford University Press:Oxford] (page 212).
  • Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, Andrew F. Smith editor [Oxford University Press:New York] 2004, Volume 1 (p. 317-8)

 

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