Bone broth is broth made from the bones of animals. Traditionally, it has been made in various cultures to be consumed as a source of nourishment. For example it has been used as a classic folk remedy for colds and flus; or for ailments that affect connective tissues like the joints, skin, lungs, muscles, and gastrointestinal tract.

Today broth is rarely made as we have moved away from home cooking in general. However in restaurants, professional chefs continue to use broths as it carries a lot of flavor and body, making it great for the base of soups, sauces and gravy. Broth is a very valuable food as it contains ingredients that are in bone. These include: minerals, protein fibers and ground substances (liquid, gel or solid). It is the valuable nutrients from the matrixes of bone and cartilage, which create the broth.

In this bone broth you can eat as a soup, as a base in a gravy, cooking liquid for rice/quinoa/amaranth, or as a tea.

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Ingredients

Bones: from poultry, fish, shellfish, beef, or lamb (no pork bones) cooked remnants of a previous meal, with or without skin and meat raw bones, with or without skin and meat.

Water: 2 cups of water per pound of bones

Lemon Juice: 2 tbsp per quart of water/ or 2 pounds of bones.

Vegetables: add amounts adjusted to amount of broth present (1 celery, 1 carrots, 1/2 onions, 3 cloves garlic and 1/4 bunch parsley for 2 cups of broth)

Method

  1. Combine bones, water and lemon in a pot, let stand for 30 minutes to 1 hour.
  2. Bring the pot to a simmer. As the broth cooks, remove any “scum” that as risen to teh top.
  3. Simmer for chicken (6-48 hours, and 12-72 hours for beef).
  4. While the broth is simmering, chop your vegetables into even pieces.
  5. Add the vegetables in the last 1/2 hour of cooking.
  6. Strain through a colander or sieve, lined with cheesecloth for a clearer broth. Discard the bones. If uncooked meat was used to start with, reserve the meat for soup or salads.
  7. Store in freezer for a couple months or in the refrigerator for ~4-5 days.

 

 

 

 

photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/21998487@N04/5462312185″>Broth and nuoc cham</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a> <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/”>(license)</a>